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Wani, S.P.; Kaushal K Garg. (2009)
Watershed Management Concept and Principles.  
In Proceedings of the Comprehensive Assessment of Watershed Programs in India, 25-27 July 2007. ICRISAT, Patancheru 502 324, Andhra Pradesh, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics. ISBN: 978-92-9066-526-7: CPE 167. pp 1-1
Category: Conference Proceeding 
Abstract: -
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
 s.wani@cgiar.org
Publ.-ID: 437    Insert: 11.03.2010 11:04 (GMT+1:00) by S.WaniLast update: 26.03.2010 06:36 (GMT+1:00) by S.Wani

Rice, M. B., W. B. Ballard, E. B. Fish, N. E. McIntyre, and D. Holdermann. 2008. (2008)
The importance of accurate landuse/landcover maps for assessing habitat suitability for black bear (Ursus americanus) in the Trans-Pecos Region of Texas. 
Wildlife Biology in Practice 4(2):48-56.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract: -
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 395    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:50 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Swift, A., Rainwater, K., Chapman, J., Noll, D., Jackson, A., Ewing, B., Song, L., Ganesan, G., Marshall, R., Doon, V., and Nash, P. 2009. (2009)
Wind Power and Water Desalination Technology Integration 
Final Report, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado. (in press with Reclamation polishing)
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract: -
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 394    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:47 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Rainwater, K.S., Fish, E.B., Zartman, R.E., Wan, C.G., Schroeder, J.L, and Burgett, W.S., 2008. (2008)
Evaluation of the TSSWCB Brush Control Program: Monitoring Needs and Water Yield Enhancement 
Report to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Austin, Texas, 95 p.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract: -
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 393    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:46 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Pinto, C. Miguel, B. Dante' Baxter, J. Delton Hanson, Francisca M. Méndez-Harclerode, John R. Suchecki, Mario J. Grijalva, Charles F. Fulhorst, and Robert D. Bradley. (2009)
Museum collections and pathogens: Trypanosoma cruzi in Texas woodrats. 
Journal of Emerging Infectious Diseases.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract: -
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 392    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:43 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Hanson, J. Delton, Jane L. Indorf, Vicki J. Swier, and Robert D. Bradley. (2009)
Molecular divergence in the Oryzomys palustris complex: evidence for multiple species.  
Journal of Mammalogy.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract:
Nucleotide sequences from 94 individuals representing the Oryzomys palustris complex (O. palustris and O. couesi) were examined to assess phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic boundaries. Sequence data from the entire mitochondrial cytochrome-b (1,143 bp), a portion of exon 1 of the nuclear interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (1,266 bp), and intron 2 of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (580 bp) genes were analyzed using phylogenetic methods (maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference). In the cytochrome-b analysis, individuals recognized as O. palustris and O. couesi formed reciprocally monophyletic clades supporting their recognition as species; however, additional phylogenetically informative phylogroups were present within each of the 2 nominate clades. In addition, levels of genetic divergence within the currently recognized taxa exceeded values normally associated with intra-species variation. Together, the phylogenetic and genetic divergence data imply that consideration should be given to recognizing 4 additional species in this complex.

Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 391    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:36 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Solari, Sergio, Steven R. Hoofer, Peter A. Larsen, Adam D. Brown, Robert J. Bull, Jose A. Guerrero, Jorge Ortega, Juan P. Carrera, Robert D. Bradley, and Robert J. Baker. (2009)
Operational criteria for genetically defined species: analysis of the diversification of the small fruit-eating bats, Dermanura (Phyllosomidae: Stenodermatinae).  
Acta Chiropterologica.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract:
Species diversity and species limits of the small fruit-eating bats, genus Dermanura (Phyllostomidae: Stenodermatinae) were examined. Estimates of species diversity based on classical morphological criteria (current taxonomy) were compared to diversity estimates based on monophyly and cytochrome-b sequence divergence. The most recent taxonomic list included nine species, whereas the genetic based list contained 11: anderseni, azteca, bogotensis, cinerea, glauca, gnoma, phaeotis, rava, rosenbergi, tolteca, and watsoni, of which three (bogotensis Andersen, rava Miller, and rosenbergi Thomas) have been considered synonyms of cinerea, glauca, phaeotis, and tolteca by previous authors. In addition, we consider incomitata to be a synonym of watsoni. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences resolved the interrelationships among taxa and prompted us to re-evaluate some morphological characters that support the distinction of all the recognized taxa, therefore providing a robust estimate of species status. A phylogenetic tree revealed a geographic component to the diversification of Dermanura, including a historical connection between western Andean and Middle American biota. In South America, no species has been recorded from both sides of the Andes Mountains, and at least one clade (glauca, gnoma, and bogotensis) is restricted to the eastern versant of the Andes. Using genetic data (monophyly and genetic distance) to identify species we were able to produce testable genealogical and biogeographic hypotheses to facilitate further studies.
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 390    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:35 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Baxter, B. Dnate', Francisca Mendez-Harclerode, Charles F. Fulhorst, and Robert D. Bradley. 2009. (2009)
A molecular examination of relatedness, multiple maternity, and cohabitation of the southern plains woodrat (Neotoma micropus).  
Journal of Mammalogy, 90:819-831.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract:
Two hundred twenty-two individuals of the southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus) were captured from 198 excavated middens at 10 discrete collecting sites from a single natural population. Field data, mitochondrial D-loop haplotypes, and polymorphic microsatellite loci (5-7) were used to determine genetic patterns in parentage, relatedness, and mating strategy. Data from microsatellite loci were highly polymorphic (average observed heterozygosity = 0.859) and were used to construct genotypes that were unique for each individual (probability of identical genotypes: 1 in 2,104,567). Results indicated a high frequency of multiple paternity (6 of 9 litters), evidence of repeat mating between the same 2 individuals, and no indication of male dominance at any collection site. These data were congruent with that of a promiscuous mating system. Relatedness values between mother and offspring averaged 0.515. Average relatedness values indicated no significant difference between adult females within sites to that of adult males, and finer-scale analyses revealed high levels of relatedness between most cohabiting individuals. When compared to data from other studies that examined mating behaviors for N. micropus, evidence from this study indicated that these mating behaviors are likely correlated with population density.
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 389    Insert: 06.01.2010 22:33 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Swier, Vicki J., Robert D. Bradley, Willem Rens, Frederick F.B. Elder, and Robert J. Baker. 2009. (2009)
Patterns of chromosomal evolution in Sigmodon, evidence from whole chromosome paints. 
Cytogenetic and Genome Research 125:54-66.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract:
Of the superfamily Muroidea (31 genera, 1578 species), the Sigmodontinae (74 genera, 377 species) is the second largest in number of species and represents a significant radiation of rodent biodiversity. Only two of the 74 genera are found in both North and South America (Sigmodon and Oryzomys) and the remainder are exclusively from South America. In recent molecular studies, the genus Sigmodon (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae) has been considered sister to many other South American Sigmodontines (Steppan et al., 2004). We examine the chromosomal evolution of 9 species of Sigmodon utilizing chromosomal paints isolated from S. hispidus, proposed to be similar to the ancestral karyotype (Elder, 1980). Utilizing a phylogenetic hypothesis of a molecular phylogeny of Sigmodon (Henson and Bradley, in press), we mapped shared chromosomal rearrangements of taxa on a molecular tree to estimate the evolutionary position of each rearrangement. For several species (S. hirsutus, S. leucotis, S. ochrognathus, S. peruanus, and S. toltecus), the karyotype accumulated few or no changes, but in three species (S. arizonae, S. fulviventer, and S. mascotensis) numerous karyotypic rearrangements were observed. These rearrangements involved heterochromatic additions, centric fusions, tandem fusions, pericentric inversions, as well as the addition of interstitial DNA not identified by paints or C-banding. The hypothesis that the ancestral karyotype for this complex had a diploid number of 52, a fundamental number of 52, and a G-band pattern of which most, if not all are similar to that present in modern day S. hispidus fails to be rejected. This hypothesis remains viable as an explanation of chromosomal evolution in Sigmodontine rodents.
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 388    Insert: 06.01.2010 19:33 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

Howell, Eric K., Ryan Duplechin, Peter A. Larsen, J. Delton Hanson, Faisal A. Anwarali Khan, Roxanne J. Larsen, Ryan R. Chambers, and Robert D. Bradley. 2009. (2009)
Mammal records from Briscoe, Dickens, Hall, and Motley counties, Texas. 
Occasional Papers, Museum of Texas Tech University, 288:1-10.
Category: Publication in Journal (peer-reviewed) 
Abstract:
Texas' diverse environment allows the existence of 143 terrestrial mammals, a number only surpassed by California and New Mexico. We conducted a number of field excursions targeting specific mammals never recorded in two Northwest Texas counties using various trapping methods. Between the two counties (Hall and Motley), 18 species of mammals, all representing new county records, were collected. These specimens are being housed in the Collection of Recent Mammals in the Natural Science Research Laboratory, Museum of Texas Tech University.
Keywords: -
Institute: International Center for Arid and Semiarid Land Studies
Publ.-ID: 387    Insert: 06.01.2010 19:32 (GMT+1:00) by P.Huddleston

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